Patient Resources

Kelly's Korner: Health & Wellness Tips with Kelly Santoro

Prostate Cancer Awareness
Shingrix Vaccine
COVID-19 Helpful Tips 
Vaccination Records
Annual
Flu Shots 
Wear Sunscreen
Breast Cancer Screening 
Keep records of your vaccination history! Keeping personal copies of your vaccination history is very helpful, especially during disease outbreaks. If you don’t already have a copy, ask your doctor for a copy and put it somewhere safe, or somewhere in the Cloud. Knowing your vaccination history also helps remind you when you are due for boosters, or that you need to receive another vaccine. For more information, click here.
Wear sunscreen everyday, especially on your face, to prevent various conditions such as sunburns, wrinkles, and skin cancer. Sunscreen can help protect our skin from the harsh UV rays from the sun. A sunscreen with at least SPF 30 is recommended for people of all ages, from babies to the elderly. Suggested places to apply sunscreen are face, ears, neck, arms, legs, and chest area. When wearing a bathing suit, be sure to apply sunscreen on the back, upper legs, upper arms, chest and abdomen as well. For more information click here.
Prostate Cancer Awareness
Shingrix Vaccine
COVID-19 Helpful Tips 
Vaccination Records
Keep records of your vaccination history! Keeping personal copies of your vaccination history is very helpful, especially during disease outbreaks. If you don’t already have a copy, ask your doctor for a copy and put it somewhere safe, or somewhere in the Cloud. Knowing your vaccination history also helps remind you when you are due for boosters, or that you need to receive another vaccine. For more information, click here.
Annual
Flu Shots 
Wear Sunscreen
Wear sunscreen everyday, especially on your face, to prevent various conditions such as sunburns, wrinkles, and skin cancer. Sunscreen can help protect our skin from the harsh UV rays from the sun. A sunscreen with at least SPF 30 is recommended for people of all ages, from babies to the elderly. Suggested places to apply sunscreen are face, ears, neck, arms, legs, and chest area. When wearing a bathing suit, be sure to apply sunscreen on the back, upper legs, upper arms, chest and abdomen as well. For more information click here.
Breast Cancer Screening 

Nutrition in the Lucky Years

Nutrition in the Lucky Years

Our nutrition program provides evidence-based dietary recommendations to help our patients achieve their health goals. As an Ellison Institute patient, you will have access to personalized nutritional advice through meetings with our Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, Kate Cohen, MS, RD, who advises patients on everything from the benefits of a Mediterranean diet to individualized approaches to managing weight, cholesterol and other health metrics. Below, we have included a delicious recipe for salmon—a Mediterranean diet staple—to help you get started on the path toward a healthier you. 
HOW TO PUT FISH ON YOUR PLATE EVERY WEEK
We all know that fish is a nutritional superstar - high in protein, low in saturated fat, loaded with vitamins and minerals and most importantly, high in anti-inflammatory Omega-3 fats that you can’t get anywhere else. But still most people don’t include enough fish in their diet because it seems complicated to shop for and prepare. Here’s an easy and delicious way to enjoy fish with lots of different flavors, but with easy preparation and clean-up every time. Fish doesn’t have to be complicated and here’s how:
HOW TO BUY FISH
You want the highest quality freshest fish available, so go somewhere you trust and preferably somewhere sourcing local fish, or as close to local as possible. Ask them questions - they know! For your health, the priority is on fish that are high in omega-3s and low in mercury so top picks include salmon, trout, Atlantic mackerel or Arctic char. But there are plenty of other fish in the sea that are high in omega-3s and low enough in Mercury to be OK for including in your monthly rotation. Here’s just a few that are also farmed or caught sustainably:

Atlantic Halibut Sablefish (Black cod)
Dover sole Wild Lake Trout
Turbot California Flounder
Pacific Rockfish Mahi-Mahi

If sustainability is a priority for you, check out the Monterey Bay Seafood Watch website where the lists are updated frequently.

THE METHOD
Fish en papillote literally means “fish in parchment” and it is the easiest way you will ever prepare fish. Even though you are cooking it in the oven, you are really steaming the fish with vegetables so the final product is juicy and flavorful, requires very little fat to cook, and doesn’t make the whole house smell like fish the way pan cooking does. Plus, when you cook it with your choice of veggies, each pouch can be a complete meal.

Keep in mind - the method is a template, not a recipe. Customize this based on your preferences and whatever fish, veggies, or spices you have on hand. Anything goes, but the results are always fresh and flavorful. The more flavors you put in, the better!

Makes 2 servings
• 2 fish fillets - 4 to 6 ounces fish of choice
• 1 to 2 cups chopped vegetables of choice
• 1 tablespoon aromatic of choice (i.e. garlic, onion, shallot, chives, etc.)
• 1 tablespoon minced fresh or dried herb of choice (parsley, thyme, sage, herbes de Provence, cilantro, etc.)
• 1 tablespoon liquid of choice (olive oil, lime juice, lemon juice, etc.)
1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.
2. On a large piece of parchment paper, layer the fish, vegetables, aromatic, and herbs. Drizzle with the fat.
3. Fold or crimp the parchment paper into a sealed pocket. Bake for 15 minutes, or until the fish is cooked through.

NOTE: Variations in cooking time may occur. If in doubt, use a food thermometer and make sure your fish is cooked to 145 degrees.
Variations
Here’s 5 different veggie-loaded combinations to get you started. Ingredients vary, but the instructions are the same for all of them. (2 servings each):
Mediterranean En Papillote
• 2 (6-ounce) Lake Trout, Halibut, Mahi Mahi, Salmon fillets
• Salt and freshly ground black pepper
• 1/2 pint grape tomatoes, halved
• 12 Kalamata olives, pitted and halved
• 2 tablespoons capers, drained
• Thin slices of red onion, to taste
• Thin slices of red bell pepper
• 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
• 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
• Juice of 1 lemon & 2 lemon slices
• 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Notes: Top each fillet with equal amounts of tomatoes, olives, capers, red onion, red bell pepper, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, red pepper flakes. Top each fillet with a lemon slice.

Southeast Asian En Papillote
• 2 fillets (6-ounce) Halibut, Flounder, or Pacific Rockfish
• Zest from 2 limes, finely shredded
• 2 limes, juiced
• 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
• 1 piece (2 inches) ginger, peeled and julienned
• 1/2 medium red onion, halved and thinly sliced
• 2 small heads baby bok choy or 2 cups spinach
• 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
• Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
• 4 sprigs fresh cilantro

Notes: Mix lime zest and juice, garlic, ginger, onion, in a medium bowl. Rub fish with olive oil, salt & pepper. Chop selected greens and drizzle with olive oil. Top each fillet with onion mixture & a few sprigs of cilantro.

En Papillote with Lemon, Shiitake mushrooms & Spinach
• 2 skinless fillets (6-ounce) Dover sole, Halibut, or Turbot
• 2 cups baby spinach
• 2 scallions
• 4 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems trimmed, halved
• 4 thin lemon slices
• Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
• 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

Notes: Divide spinach evenly between parchment. Top with scallions and mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper. Top each with 1 lemon slice, 1 fillet, and another lemon slice and drizzle with 1 & 1/2 teaspoons oil. Season with salt and pepper. 

Salmon with Pesto Zoodles
• 2 (6-ounce) Salmon fillets
• 1 small zucchini (about 2 cups spiralized), ends trimmed and washed
• 1 cup grape tomatoes, chopped
• 3 tablespoons pesto
• Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
• Pine nuts and lemon slices for garnish

Notes: Spiralize zucchini or use pre-spiralized. Add tomatoes & pesto and toss to combine. Add veggies to parchment, then top with salmon. Coat salmon with remaining pesto, salt & pepper

Miso Fish En Papillote
• 2 (6-ounce) Sablefish, Halibut, Sea bass or flounder fillets
• 1 tbsp & 1 tsp white miso
• 2 tsp mirin
• 1 tsp fresh ginger
• Juice of 1 lime
• 12 stalks of asparagus trimmed
• 1 small Japanese eggplant thinly sliced at diagonal
• 3/4 red bell pepper thinly sliced
• Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
• 2 tbsp sliced green onion
• 1 tbsp sesame seeds

Notes: Mix white miso, mirin ginger and lime juice until combined. Generously coat fillets & let stand for 30 minutes if possible. Place 6 stalks of asparagus, sliced red pepper and 4 - 5 slices of eggplant. Place fillet on top of veggies and top with sliced green onion & sesame seeds.

Suggested Reading Material

The Lucky Years

Bestselling author David Agus unveils the brave new world of medicine, one in which we can take control of our health like never before and doctors can fine-tune strategies and weapons to prevent illness. In his first bestseller, The End of Illness, David Agus revealed how to add vibrant years to your life by knowing the real facts of health. In this book, he builds on that theme by showing why this is the luckiest time yet to be alive, giving you the keys to the new kingdom of wellness. READ MORE

A Short Guide to a Long Life

In his #1 New York Times bestselling book, The End of Illness, Dr. David B. Agus shared what he has learned from his work as a pioneering doctor and researcher, revealing the innovative steps he takes to prolong the lives of not only cancer patients but all those hoping to enjoy a vigorous, lengthy life. Now Dr. Agus has turned his analysis into a practical and concise illustrated handbook for everyday living. He believes optimal health begins with our daily habits. READ MORE

The End of Illness

What if everything you thought about health was wrong?
Can we live robustly until our last breath? Do we have to suffer from debilitating conditions and sickness? Is it possible to add more vibrant years to our lives? And has the time come for us to stop thinking about disease as something the body “gets” or “has” but rather to think of it as something the body does? READ MORE